Flavors

Orange Blossom Water

Ever since orange trees made their appearance in the Middle East, people have been distilling their flower petals to produce flavorful and fragrant orange blossom water for food preparation. At the end of the 17th century, Anne Marie Orsini, Duchess of Bracciano and Princess of Nerola, Italy, used the essence of the bitter orange tree blossoms to perfume her baths. Today, the fragrance continues to gain popularity.

Flavors

Orange Blossom Water

Ever since orange trees made their appearance in the Middle East, people have been distilling their flower petals to produce flavorful and fragrant orange blossom water for food preparation. At the end of the 17th century, Anne Marie Orsini, Duchess of Bracciano and Princess of Nerola, Italy, used the essence of the bitter orange tree blossoms to perfume her baths. Today, the fragrance continues to gain popularity.

Quantity sizes in fluid ounces
  • 2
  • 4
  • 18
  • Professionals
    Please click here for larger sizes
  • Sweet ideas: custards, puddings, cakes, cookies, candies, confections, brownies, cakes
  • Savory ideas: dressings, marinades, soups
  • Beverage ideas: black or green herbal teas, Pimm’s Cup, punch, margaritas, orange blossom cocktails, martinis
  • Other ideas: aromatherapy (add a teaspoon to two cups of water and simmer)
  • Chef’s notes: The sweet water pairs nicely with vanilla, chocolate, almond, cream, lemon and other citrus flavors. It is used in madeleines in France, wedding cakes in Mexico and scones and cocktails, such as the Ramos Gin Fizz, in the U.S.

Ever since oranges made their appearance in the Middle East, people have been distilling the petals to produce flavorful and fragrant orange blossom water for food preparation. At the end of the 17th century, Anne Marie Orsini, Duchess of Bracciano and Princess of Nerola, Italy, used the essence of the bitter orange tree blossoms to perfume her baths. Today, the fragrance continues to gain popularity.

A cross between a pomelo and a mandarin, the orange was originally cultivated by ancient Southeast Asians and is therefore known in a number of languages as the “Chinese Apple.” Unlike what you might expect, the name orange doesn’t actually refer to the color but, instead, comes from the Sanskrit word for fragrant. After thousands of years, the fruit trees spread to North Africa in the First Century A.D. Later, the Moorish conquest of Spain spread oranges north into Europe. Orange seeds made the trip across the Atlantic with Columbus, quickly spreading throughout the warmer regions of North America, Central and South America as well as the Caribbean.

Propylene Glycol, Alcohol (45%), Orange Oil, Natural Flavors

  • Kosher Certified
  • Gluten-Free Certified
  • All-Natural
  • Allergen-Free
  • GMO-Free

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"It’s no secret, both for cooking and baking, always use the best ingredients. What’s the point of investing time to create something and use average ingredients? Vanilla Extract and Vanilla Bean Paste are my favorites, as well as the Lemon Extract. I like using the Vanilla Bean Paste, as it is the closest to using fresh vanilla pods with all the glorious little seeds, and the consistency doesn’t interfere with the recipes.”

Eric lanlard UK Chef, TV Host, Master Pâtissier and Cookbook Author